Rape Survivors Talk About Why They Tweeted Their Stories

TIME

JoAnne Cusick was wearing a pink floral sundress and jelly sandals when she was sexually assaulted at the age of eight by a group of neighborhood boys. Believing that she was to blame, she kept the secret for nine years until she told a priest about the attack during confession. He assured her that she was innocent in the eyes of God, and the eyes of the world.

Twenty-eight years later, Cusick, now a 37-year-old nurse living in Colorado, shared that secret on social media joining hundreds of other victims who tweeted their stories of assault. These women (and a number of men) were responding to a simple question that went viral on Twitter Wednesday night asking victims what they were wearing when they were assaulted. Within hours, a long list of outfits—ranging from sweatshirts to pajamas to bathing suits—accompanied by stories of rape and assault filled Twitter feeds, replacing…

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The new TED.com lets you dig deeper into ideas and see your influence on how they spread

TED Blog

launch Today on TED.com , you’ll notice some changes. That’s because we have launched our first major redesign since the site debuted in 2007, back when online video was just a twinkle in the Internet’s eye. You might notice that this redesign responds to the things that you, the TED community, have told us on repeat. First: You need TED to be as easy to use on your mobile or tablet as it is on your computer. Second: When you watch a talk that grabs you, you want to do something, whether it’s taking action or learning more. Finally: You want the TED experience to be far more personalized, in ways that directly support your viewing patterns.

There’s lots to discover on the new TED.com — created in collaboration with design partner Huge — but here are a few places to begin exploring.* (Be in touch with us via TED.com/contact to…

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