Category Archives: Uncategorized

Study: Drug Testing Boots African-American Employment

TIME

It’s no secret that America’s war on drugs hasn’t gone well, at least in economic and racial terms. Labor economist Abigail Wozniak investigated the relationship between race, drug testing, and employment, publishing a paper in the National Bureau of Economic Research with her findings. Surprisingly, she found that the rise of drug testing actually boosts African-American employment by a significant percentage: In states with a high prevalence of drug testing, African-American employment increased between 7% and 30%, while wages increased between 1.4 and 13%.

“A common assumption is that the rise of drug testing must have had negative consequences for black employment,” she writes. “However, the rise of employer drug testing may have benefited African-Americans by enabling non-using blacks to prove their status to employers.”

In case you missed it: She’s saying that, because African-Americans are perceived to use more drugs, drug testing enables them to objectively prove to employers…

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“Concerning Violence” Sundance 2014 Review

This film had a profound effect on me January at #Sundance . The psychological effects of colonialism lasts for generations. #BringBackOurGirls

thepreciousjewels

“Concerning Violence: Nine Scenes from the Anti-Imperialistic Self-Defense” is based upon the book The Wretched of the Earth: A Negro Psychoanalyst’s Study of the Problems of Racism & Colonialism in the World Today by Frantz Fanon.  Frantz Omar Fanon was born July 20, 1925  in Fort-de-France, Martinique. He was a West Indian psychoanalyst and social philosopher. He was raised and nurtured in the French Empire as a man of privilege. However, he quickly learned that his privilege meant nothing with his own people and definitely not with those colonizing his country. Fanon later became a resident of the Bethesda, MD before he died in 1961.

While attending to the needs of the soldiers of the Free French Army during World War II, Fanon begin to discover the effects that colonial violence had on the human spirit.  He began his study of the effects colonial violence had on men, women and…

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Rape Survivors Talk About Why They Tweeted Their Stories

TIME

JoAnne Cusick was wearing a pink floral sundress and jelly sandals when she was sexually assaulted at the age of eight by a group of neighborhood boys. Believing that she was to blame, she kept the secret for nine years until she told a priest about the attack during confession. He assured her that she was innocent in the eyes of God, and the eyes of the world.

Twenty-eight years later, Cusick, now a 37-year-old nurse living in Colorado, shared that secret on social media joining hundreds of other victims who tweeted their stories of assault. These women (and a number of men) were responding to a simple question that went viral on Twitter Wednesday night asking victims what they were wearing when they were assaulted. Within hours, a long list of outfits—ranging from sweatshirts to pajamas to bathing suits—accompanied by stories of rape and assault filled Twitter feeds, replacing…

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The new TED.com lets you dig deeper into ideas and see your influence on how they spread

TED Blog

launch Today on TED.com , you’ll notice some changes. That’s because we have launched our first major redesign since the site debuted in 2007, back when online video was just a twinkle in the Internet’s eye. You might notice that this redesign responds to the things that you, the TED community, have told us on repeat. First: You need TED to be as easy to use on your mobile or tablet as it is on your computer. Second: When you watch a talk that grabs you, you want to do something, whether it’s taking action or learning more. Finally: You want the TED experience to be far more personalized, in ways that directly support your viewing patterns.

There’s lots to discover on the new TED.com — created in collaboration with design partner Huge — but here are a few places to begin exploring.* (Be in touch with us via TED.com/contact to…

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“Concerning Violence” Sundance 2014 Review

“Concerning Violence: Nine Scenes from the Anti-Imperialistic Self-Defense” is based upon the book The Wretched of the Earth: A Negro Psychoanalyst’s Study of the Problems of Racism & Colonialism in the World Today by Frantz Fanon.  Frantz Omar Fanon was born July 20, 1925  in Fort-de-France, Martinique. He was a West Indian psychoanalyst and social philosopher. He was raised and nurtured in the French Empire as a man of privilege. However, he quickly learned that his privilege meant nothing with his own people and definitely not with those colonizing his country. Fanon later became a resident of the Bethesda, MD before he died in 1961.

While attending to the needs of the soldiers of the Free French Army during World War II, Fanon begin to discover the effects that colonial violence had on the human spirit.  He began his study of the effects colonial violence had on men, women and eventually the entire nation. His study, while intense, attempts to prove that violence was a necessary precursor for decolonization.

Goran Hugo Olsson, the director, takes us into the recesses of colonialism and the horrid effects it had on the people. African people were stripped of their native language, culture, social and political birthrights. In some cases, it was done by people who looked just like them. One of the more poignant moments in the film for me was when an interviewer was talking with a Caucasian man and this man described the native people of the country as “terrorists.” While he owned (took) land and developed it (with the help of the native people), he viewed them as “terrorists.” This was due to their uprising and attempting to decolonize their nation. He went on to describe a young man who was cleaning his mother’s car and how that young man told his mother, “Ms., one day I’m going to drive a car like this!” His mother said, “I will burn that car before I let you drive it!” The interviewee just went on about how the ‘“terrorists” all had cars and were taking over!’

The sense of entitlement that the colonials had in a country that they did not build was, once again, mind boggling. Without giving too much more of the movie away, it is a must see movie! Fanon was to colonialism what W.E.B. Dubois was to racism. Two dynamic men fighting similar causes across the globe. Olsson used awesome narration, done by Ms. Lauryn Hill, powerful interviews, and images to convey what Fanon witnessed first-hand. This movie makes no attempt to pacify the atrocities of colonialism. In fact, it does the opposite, it peels away the layers and gets to the heart of what happens to a people when colonization occurs.