11 Surprising Facts About Women and Poverty From the Shriver Report

U.S.

Maria Shriver’s annual report on Women in America came out Sunday, and the findings are bleak.

“These are not women trying to ‘have it all,'” Shriver wrote in the introduction to the report, which was co-sponsored by the  Center for American Progress. “These are women who are already doing it all — working hard, providing, parenting, and care-giving. They’re doing it all, yet they and their families can’t prosper, and that’s weighing the U.S. economy down.”

Here’s what we learned from the in-depth report on how women are doing in  post-recession America.

  1. 1 in 3 American women, 42 million women, plus 28 million children, either live in poverty or are right on the brink of it. (The report defines the “brink of poverty” as making $47,000 a year for a family of four.)
  2. Nearly two-thirds of minimum wage workers are women, and these workers often get zero paid sick…

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Forget Mega-Corporations, Here’s The Mega-Network

TechCrunch

We live in the age of cryptocurrency heists, Chinese moon landings, eco-disasters and electronic cigarettes. Sounds like something out of a cyberpunk novel.

Well, a cyberpunk novel without the brain implants, but don’t worry, those are coming, too. But one big cyberpunk theme that hasn’t come to pass is the rise of mega-corporations — those huge multinational conglomerates, like Robocop‘s OCP, that owned everything from baby food companies to police departments.

Corporations are arguably more powerful today than ever before. But the economy isn’t dominated by a handful of megalithic conglomerates. it consists of hundreds or thousands of smaller, more specialized firms. Our cyberpunk future-present is dominated instead by a new power structure: the mega-network.

The Incredible Shrinking Firm

Science fiction is more about the present than the future, as the saying goes. And in the late 1970s and early 1980s — when the original cyberpunk stories were…

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